Thursday, June 2, 2016
4:00 - 4:20 PM
Ted Talks - Duluth/MacKenzie

Measuring Economic Value Using Administrative Data

The need for credible estimates of the economic impacts of commercial nature-based tourism (CNBT) is important for Crown land decision making and nature-based tourism product development.  Measuring the economic value of any sector can be cumbersome.
In 2001 to measure the overall value of CNBT involved using traditional methodologies took a significant amount of time and effort of conducting phone calls to encourage businesses to provide survey responses and/or financial records.  In fact, due to poor responses to surveys, it took almost three years to complete the study.

Over the past decade there is a greater ability to use existing administrative data. Currently, Destination BC is working with Align Research and BC Statistics to use existing data sources (WorkSafe BC, GST and BC Registrar) to develop economic value indicators (from supply side of information) for the purpose of measuring the value of CNBT.  If successful, this process would serve as a way to measure and track sector trends year-over-year and at more granular level. The presentation will focus on key learnings and outcomes of the study (as the study is still being implemented and set to complete shortly).

Interest Statement:
Measuring the economic value of any sector can be challenging and has been inconsistent in research approach. In 2001, to measure the overall value of nature-based tourism Destination British Columbia conducted supply-side research which included a significant amount of volunteer time and effort conducting phone calls to encourage businesses to provide survey responses and/or financial records and a considerable amount of time program managing the project. This type of traditional methodology is not only costly and time consuming, economic impacts are typically for a select time frame which do not provide year over year comparisons and with varying methodologies between studies do not allow for comparisons. This type of methodology is also becoming increasingly challenging with the new challenge of having CASL contact limitations.

This presentation will provide an example of how Destination BC used a new methodology that could be used to develop economic indicators that would enable a sector to be tracked over time. This new methodology taps into available administrative data. Often available administrative data is only used as a background source with cautionary notes of how to interpret data or how terminology is defined due to information being published at the public level in an aggregated level. Often a further exploration of administrated data is avoided as it is believed any further microscopic refinement is impossible or too time consuming or burdensome to complete. This project is an example of how publically available information was used to develop an inventory of relevant tourism businesses and then matched against existing administrative data in a new way to serve as a long-term way to measure and track industry trends in a way that was impossible before and at more granular level, allowing for reporting at regional/sub-regional, sub-sectors level without the need to complete business surveys. The presentation will focus on key learnings and outcomes of the study (as the study is still being implemented).

As a result of this session, participants will:


Nancy Radman, CMRP
Research, Planning and Evaluation, Destination BC

Nancy Radman has been part of the Research, Planning and Evaluation team of Destination BC for over seven years and is currently in the Senior Researcher position. In 2012, Nancy attained her CMRP designation from MRIA. She graduated from the Post-Graduate Research Analyst program from Georgian College in 2008 and has a bachelor of Health Science from the University of Waterloo. Her responsibilities include overseeing the stakeholder satisfaction survey, industry trend tracking, program evaluation, sector development studies, and visitor profile studies.